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Flood recovery work progressing in Fish Creek Provincial Park

Flood-damaged pathways, picnic spots and bridges are being restored in Alberta’s busiest provincial park. 

Bridge 9 June 2013

Pedestrian bridge was washed out by flood waters

One of the largest urban parks in North America, attracting more than two million visits per year, Fish Creek Provincial Park was extensively damaged by the June 2013 flood.

Initial repair and cleanup was completed in the park last year, and major infrastructure projects are progressing throughout the summer of 2014.

“The value of having a beautiful piece of parkland within the City of Calgary can’t be understated. Thanks to the dedicated work of parks staff and volunteers, Fish Creek Provincial Park is rebounding quickly from last year’s devastating flood, and we are determined to make sure park users will continue to enjoy the park for years to come.”

Dr. Richard Starke, Minister, Tourism, Parks and Recreation

Bridges, pathways, and day-use areas along both Fish Creek and the Bow River were damaged by the 2013 flood, which also affected the park’s link to the City of Calgary’s extensive regional pathway system.

Projects underway include:

  • restoring banks  on the Bow River and reducing risk of future erosion;
  • rebuilding abutments on a key Bow River bridge (Bridge 14);
  • reconnecting the park’s paved pathways with the entrance to the Sue Higgins Bridge;
  • repairing  pathways in Bebo Grove and Hull’s Wood;
  • clearing flood debris from day-use areas at Mallard Point and Bankside;
  • completing planning around park access and creek crossings at the Acadia entrance.

The initial cleanup in the park was completed with the help of The Friends of Fish Creek volunteers, and larger infrastructure projects have been undertaken with full planning consideration for park ecosystems, watershed ecology, and recreational use.

Alberta Parks is holding an information session about the flood recovery work on Tuesday, July 15, from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. in the Fish Creek Environmental Learning Centre at 13931 Woodpath Road SW.

As part of the Government of Alberta’s investment of $81 million for flood recovery in Alberta’s provincial parks and recreation areas, approximately $16 is designated for Fish Creek Provincial Park, with $60 million designated for Kananaskis Country, and $5 million for other areas, including Wyndham Carseland Provincial Park and Oldman River Provincial Recreation Area. 


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